bars of gold

Deleting emails – trash, treasure, or amnesia?

For some mysterious reason, a lot of people appear to be positively obsessed with deleting emails. The other day we referred one of our correspondents to a discussion which took place a couple of months earlier. Astonishingly, their reply was: “I don´t keep emails that far back“. Why???bars of gold

FWIW, our basic rule is to keep all non-spam emails, because any email can turn out to be useful for future reference (or indeed even used as “evidence”) at any point in time. For this reason, we regard our very comprehensive email archive (dating back to the 1990s) as an invaluable resource. Additionally, the process of regularly deciding which emails to keep and which to delete is both a tedious and unconstructive activity.

At one time webmail services had very tight storage limits and ruthlessly bounced new emails once we hit the limit, and computers had small hard drives which would often fill up.  Nowadays disk space is hardly an issue and we can just let stuff pile up in the cloud, unless a cloudburst sends it pouring down to earth. Read more

Abbreviation (initialism) of the Day: UKCS

According to the comprehensive documentation on the Development of UK Oil and Gas Resources, published by Data by Design Ltd, the UK Continental Shelf (UKCS) comprises those areas of the sea bed and subsoil beyond the territorial sea over which the UK exercises sovereign rights of exploration and exploitation of natural resources. The map below shows the UKCS has been extended since the mid 1960s. The exact limits of the UKCS are set out in orders made under section 1(7)of the Continental Shelf Act 1964.

UK Continental Shelf Designatios. Source: www.dbd-data.co.uk