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Recent finds of German words in English

To see language in action today, check our list of random recent finds of people using German words in English. These terms are already included in our growing collection of German words used in English, which you can read here.

13 Oct 2019, Paul Bisceglio in The Atlantic on The Greatest, Fakest World Record:
… appeared to spare no expense when it came to either the groundbreaking science or the marketing blitz leading up to the event.

02 Oct 2019, W. Ranald Boydell in The Conversation on the climate crisis:
The irony is that disagreement about the merits of the article seemed to cause more angst than its subject matter.

02 Oct 2019, Deutsche Welle news:
Zebra shot dead after jaunt on German autobahn

01 Oct 2919, retweet by Oliver Daddow with comment:
Nice thread on the Kafkaesque search for the ‘how’ of #Brexit.

17 Sep 2019, George Monbiot on neoliberalism in Our Brezhnev Moment:
Far from eliminating bureaucracy, it has created a Kafkaesque system of mad diktats and stifling control.

11 Sep 2019, Stephen Bush in New Statesman:
Lee abstained on the 2013 equal marriage act and his voting record is a source of angst among Lib Dems…

 

Bauhaus school building in Dessau

From Bauhaus to Baumhaus to Our House via Oz

2019 sees centenary celebrations for Germany’s groundbreaking Bauhaus design school, whose 14 year lifespan influenced art, architecture and design worldwide throughout the twentieth century and beyond. On 8 September The Bauhaus Museum opens in Dessau, and HE Translations have added the word Bauhaus to our growing list of German words used in English, many of them highly influential terms. Read more

Image of Gears

Germany’s Mittelstand: standstill or foundation of the Industrie 4.0 future?

The German economy owes much of its success to the country’s Mittelstand, a uniquely German term used to refer to Germany’s highly developed and export-oriented mid-sized business sector. Mittelstand is roughly translated into English as SME or Small and Medium Enterprise sector, but the Mittelstand is characterised by more than just the simple number of employees or the size of the annual turnover. Due to its ethos and importance, and focus on manufacturing, the Mittelstand has been the subject of considerable study and discussion, as well as concerns for its future when facing the challenges of technological change and international competition. Clearly it can’t afford to stand still if the German Wirtschaftswunder is to continue, so what is the Mittelstand and where is it going? Can small business and manufacturing survive in a world of globalised giants and the feverish flow of investor funds into speculative startups? Read more

raised knife

Are EU elections a betrayal? Dance of the Dolchstossers

As the UK faces EU elections some promised to end, Germany offers us the lesson of the Dolchstosslegende, a myth much used to paint defeat as the work of backstabbing traitors, rather than failed leaders. After First World War defeat in 1918, Germany’s militarists promoted the Dolchstosslegende, or Stab-In-The-Back Myth, contrafactually claiming that they could and would have won the war if weak-kneed pacifist politicians had not undermined them and stabbed them in the back, robbing the country of a great victory.

Read more

What is Energiewende

wind turbine and sun

What is Energiewende and where does it come from?

English is getting a new word as energiewende creeps in and cleans up. No, not energy for a Wendy house, but the turning point and transition to renewable energy without the cost of nuclear. The most concise word for this today comes from German, where the national energy policy of Energiewende is leading the way towards… read more

 

Imports are making English rich, and HE Translations are assembling an online treasure-trove explaining words that English has imported from German.  Technology, sustainability, psychology and even food are fueling our appetite for new terms, and Germany is serving them up freely. Lost for words? Try some
new ones and go with the zeitgeist!